I have moved!

I have moved All things paint and plaster…  over to: http://allthingspaintandplasters.blogspot.com/

Please join me!

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I miss this!

I just came across several issues of the now demised House & Garden magazine.

I certainly miss it! While Veranda, AD, ID, Traditional Home, etc. are the go-to magazines, I used to really look forward to browsing House & Garden’s unique view of the design world. It was slightly more down-to-earth, but savvy just the same.

I particularly liked the floral and garden coverage. And they seemed to be in the forefront of the green movement coverage as it related to our own homes.

May it one day return!

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Mosaics a la Venice

Talk about patience! These intriguing mosiac photos are taken in the Venetian atelier of Angelo Orsoni. The company was founded in 1888 and is located close to the Cannaregio canal in the Cannaregio district, off of the Grand Canal.
These glass tiles, or smalti,  are made according to the original recipes with glass and pigments, poured into slabs, cooled and cut into miniature pieces. The Orsoni mosaics are really exquisite fine art and are shipped all over the world.
The following photos are courtesy of Maisons Cote Sud. Photography by Bernard Touillon.
Orsoni mosaic library

up close

Powder pigment

These last two mosaics were picked up at an antique sale. They were made in Italy by students at an art school in Venice.

I would love to see other mosaic examples. Care to share?

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Cultivated Pleasures

After visiting Greet’s lovely new outbuilding in this Belgian Pearl post (here) and admiring Trish’s poppies and David Austin roses in this Trouvais post (here), I thought I’d share some bits of my garden with you. The tulips, helleborous, magnolia and dogwood are in full bloom now, with the lily of the valley, tree peonies and lilacs almost ready to burst.

Before I started painting and plastering, I really wanted to open a garden accessories and antique shop. I would have named it Cultivated Pleasures as I’ve always loved that name. Wouldn’t that be a perfect blog name? Hmmm….

The small round leaves in the foreground are European ginger. We split them every year as they make a wonderful ground cover.

rock tulip

helleborus

helleborus

hostas

dogwood

peony unfurling

peony almost open

Have a fun weekend!

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Veggies and fruits for your walls

I chuckled when I saw this ad for Tollens paint, but it demonstrates a great way to transform your color preferences and ideas into actual colors for your walls. Gather up those photos you’ve been setting aside and take them to the paint store for color matching. Or ask your decorative painter to create a special finish based on the fish you’ve got in your hands!

Tollens paint

I found these veggie images with great color:

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and when I saw the recent issue of New York Spaces magazine with the articles on using color in the home, the veggie and fruit colors just leaped out from the paper:

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New York Spaces Photo by Brian Park

This is a lime plaster sample I created on textured wallpaper.

Lime plaster on textured wallpaper

These fun peach colors…

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certainly made their way into this room!

New York Spaces Photo by Brian Park

Who can resist these luscious colors?

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They were my starting point for this sample of paint and water-based waxes.

Paint and water-based waxes

You can find color ideas everywhere, even in the kitchen!

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A fleeting moment

Can you imagine spending many weeks preparing to install a work of art, followed by three weeks of the actual installation in a museum, only to have it painted over once the exhibition closed? On purpose?

Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images

Artist Richard Wright did just that. The Glasgow-based artist won the Turner prize last December in the Tate Britain Museum for his untitled, baroque-style fresco that is created with gold leaf on the entire wall of a gallery. Wright began with the traditional pounce method used in fresco: a cartoon (drawing) was pierced with holes through which chalk was rubbed. Once the cartoon was removed, a “ghost” outline was left. He then sized (applied a special adhesive for the gold leaf) the outlined areas, followed by the application of the gold leaf at just the right time. If the size is too dry, the gold leaf will not adhere. If the size is too “wet”, the gold leaf becomes dull. Honestly, how he did it in just three weeks amazes me!

AP photo / Akira Suemori

The fresco, seen from afar, seemed like an abstract design but up close, the design was composed of landscape images such as clouds and sun. It was said to be mesmerizingly beautiful.

Once the Turner exhibition was finished, the fresco was painted over. Whew! Wright said: “To see a work knowing that it will not last emphasizes that moment of its existence”.

Credit

France 24

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Weekend Favorites: Aged Patina

Aged patinas always catch my eye. It’s a way to see into the past and appreciate the artistry of people before us. With all of the technology we have at our fingertips, don’t you just wonder how they did it one hundred, five hundred, a thousand or two years ago?

Veranda magazine

Carolyn Quartermaine Revealed

Carolyn Quartermaine Revealed

House Beautiful magazine

House Beautiful magazine

House Beautiful magazine

House Beautiful magazine

Tara Shaw

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